Tag Archives: June 11th

The Hague, The Netherlands: Banner and posters on international solidarity day with anarchist prisoners

received 6/11/18

Today, June 11, is the international solidarity day with anarchist prisoners. That’s why, last week, we put posters up in The Hague, the Netherlands and hung a banner today with the text: ‘Freedom for all anarchist prisoners’.

The solidarity day with anarchist prisoners arose to draw attention to comrades held in the dungeons of the state, to show that they are not forgotten and to make fight against the prison society.

Solidarity with Lisa, who is serving a prison sentence of seven and a half years on suspicion of a bank robbery in Germany. Solidarity with Peike, who is serving a prison sentence of two years and seven months because of resisting against the G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany. Freedom for all anarchist prisoners!

Against a world of banks, the state, prisons and the world that needs them!

For anarchy!

In German

June 11, 2018: A Day Against Oblivion

June 11th is an international day of solidarity with Marius Mason and all long-term anarchist prisoners. A spark in the eternal night of state repression. A day set aside for honoring those who have been stolen from us. On this day, we share in songs, events, and actions to celebrate our captured comrades and loved ones. In years past, June 11th celebrations have been international and wide-ranging – from potlucks with friends to various inspiring attacks; fundraising benefits and prisoner letter writing nights to all of the untold and unknown ways we keep the flame alive.

Building up to this day, each year several of us come together to discuss and reflect on lessons from years past and to renew this call for continuous solidarity. This year we invite you to explore and ponder w ith us how maintaining support for long-term prisoners depends directly on sustaining the movements and struggles we all remain part of. How can we expect to continue through decades of support as movements, groups, and people come and go, burn out, and get caught in the exhausting ebbs and flows of struggle? Going deeper, what can we learn from long-term prisoners and their legacies of solidarity? How can we sustain and improve the health of our movements, and in turn strengthen that support?

Over the last several years, critiques of incarceration have flourished, often resulting in a myriad of prisoner support efforts and projects. Embodying stability, commitment, and longevity are prisoners from Black liberation, the New Left, indigenous movements, and those who have unceasingly supported them for decades. In addition to these efforts, there has been an upsurge in organizing against mass incarceration itself. Though smaller groups had been pioneering these sentiments for many years prior, it is encouraging to see more people taking up this work. There has also been an extension efforts to support prison rebels who have been engaging in everything from work strikes to burning and trashing entire units on the inside. At the same time, more and moreprojects are critiquing the state itself – identifying that it is upheld by the pillars of prisons and police. Finally, there are more efforts aimed at addressing the needs of queer and trans prisoners, criminalized survivors of domestic and sexual abuse, and people living with mental health challenges, just to name a few.

In the spirit of June 11th, which invites everyone to participate according to their own desires, personal affinities, and tactical preferences, it encourages us to see such widespread activity. One thing in particular that we have been heartened to see is just how widespread newsletters, blogs, books, and zines written by prisoners have become. After years of discussion about amplifying prisoners’ voices, we are seeing the results and appreciate the countless hours put in by both prisoners and supporters to launch and sustain these publications. Complementing these efforts are those which have furthered international solidarity by translating and transmitting ´the words of our comrades, and those who have undertaken beautiful gestures and messages of solidarity with bold action and attack.

Amongst these many prisoner support projects we see a variety of orientations, tactics, strategies, and practices. Along with the
expansion of initiatives has come endless emergencies and urgent calls to action to have prisoners’ backs, on top of all the other constant crises in this nightmare world. With so much to do, we are forced to make choices. Traditional activism, which demands so much of our energy be directed into immediate and often symbolic responses at the expense of long-term intentions and strategies, simply will not do. We need to act with an eye towards sustaining our movements and projects, so that we remain capable of supporting comrades spending decades in prison. This requires a holistic approach to struggle and living in solidarity.
One-time gestures are important, and sometimes the best we can do. But what does it mean to be in it for the long haul?

While June 11th is only one day, it is a manifestation of the daily strength and fortitude of imprisoned comrades and the tireless,
behind-the-scenes work of those who support them. This often looks like visiting; writing; raising money; spreading information; and sharingtheir artwork, poems, and writings. We are inspired by Jeremy Hammond and Marius Mason’s support crews working consistently to keep them connected to the rest of the world. We hearken back to Sacramento Prisoner Support fighting for years to get Eric McDavid free. We are humbled by so many who have helped long-term prisoners like Zolo Azania, Russell Maroon Shoatz, David Gilbert, Sean Swain, Mumia Abu-Jamal, Jalil Muntaqim, Leonard Peltier and so many others publish books written in their cells.

Visions & Possibilities

Faced with both the long-term prospect of aiding comrades through decades in prison and the short-term work that this solidarity entails, we risk getting lost in alternating currents of despair and mania that leave no space for reflection. It’s difficult to know where to move when faced with the overwhelming task of ameliorating the deprivation and misery our comrades face, while also remaining critical of reformism. We want our comrades free now and all prisons demolished immediately, but we have no idea how to do this. Despite our combined decades of acting in solidarity with anarchist prisoners, we have no blueprint, only visions.

By throwing away divisive dichotomies and their tactical fetishes (mass struggle vs. direct action), we can come to a new metric by which to judge our work: can this sustain me and my comrades through the coming years? It seems unlikely that a vibrant movement of solidarity with prisoners can come to bloom if our concerns are solely ideological, tactical, or strategic. The joy and difficulty of human relationships, the sadness engendered by concrete and razor wire, the struggle againstoppressive ideas and behavior and the concurrent need for transformative forms of addressing conflict, the excitement and fear that come with a comrade’s release, and the frustration and exhaustion of doing this work should all become part of how we envision solidarity.

It seems to us that by actively engaging in these considerations, we can begin to think beyond the immediate crises: restricted literature, missing letters, stints in solitary, harassment from guards, scrambling for commissary funds, restricted phone calls and visits. By grounding ourselves in relationships with individuals in prison – seeing them not as celebrities, leaders, or abstract “oppressed people”– we open space to dream of what a life shared in common with our imprisoned comrades could mean. With this, we exit the realm of the purely political and enter the realm of the human. One cannot survive on duty and ideology, but human relationships can nourish and sustain us. And we must continuously fight to maintain clear paths to reach our comrades in this way, as the state continues to dehumanize and isolate them, increasingly restricting visits to those behind glass or worse, those on a screen, whether we be a few yards or hundreds of miles away. In-person and contact visits, priceless for building real human connection, are often high on the list of demands from prisoners and those supporting them on the outside. Recently we’ve been inspired by Fight Toxic Prisons’ campaign to keep contact visits in the Florida Department of Corrections.

We must strive for lives intertwined with our friends and comrades in prison. And indeed, in many ways, they are. The repression of prisoner support groups by Operation Scripta Manent (the Italian state’s attempt to repress anarchist activities by accusing individuals of carrying out incendiary and explosive attacks) remind us that there is often a thin line separating those who are imprisoned and those who are outside supporting them in whatever way they can.

What can these considerations on building sustainable movements, communities, and projects sugges t to us when thinking about accompanying our comrades through both pre-trial repression and post-release transitions? Passing on historical and intergenerational knowledge from those who have already survived the worst the state could throw at them would certainly be helpful and inspiring to those currently fighting to remain free. And what would be better for a comrade coming out of prisonthan a strong community and friends who have already been working and envisioning lives together?

Prisoner Updates

Throughout the past year, our imprisoned comrades have faced the cold eyes and violent hands of the state with integrity intact. In Chile, Tamara Sol attempted to escape from prison, was seriously injured in the process, and has since been transferred: first to a maximum security prison in Santiago, and then to the especially brutal Llancahue prison in Valdivia. The “Bombs Case 2” wrapped up, with Juan Flores found guilty of multiple bombings in Santiago and sentenced to 23 years in prison. In Germany, Lisa was sentenced to over 7 years in prison after being found guilty of robbing a bank in Aachen. She was transferred to JVA Willich II in February. In the United States, Walter Bond went on hunger strike for six days, demanding vegan meals, an end to mailtampering, and transfer to New York where he intends to live upon release. In retaliation, he was transferred to the Communications Management Unit in Terre Haute, Indiana. In Greece, Pola Roupa and Nikos Maziotis went on hunger strike for nearly 40 days demanding better conditions and more time for visits, as well as the abolition of the ultra-repressive C-type prison that Nikos has been held in. Dinos Yagtzoglou was arrested and is facing charges related to a letter bomb that injured a former Greek prime minister. His resistance behind bars sparked an uprising at three Greek prisons, securing his demand of transfer to Korydallos prison.

In the United States, trans anarchist and eco/animal liberation prisoner Marius Mason needs more mail! He enjoys getting articles about animal rights, environmental activism, resistance to the alt-right, Black Lives Matter, and other prison struggles. Carswell Federal Medical Center, where Marius has been held for the past several years, is a notoriously restrictive and cruel facility. Currently they are denying him medical care for his transition as promised, as well as adequate vegan food options.

June 11th is an idea, not just a day. June 11th is every day. And ideas are bulletproof. Let’s breathe life into the rest of the year and renew the celebration of anarchist prisoners’ lives by carrying on their struggles alongside them.

In short: It’s a call-out, so we’re calling on you! June 11th is what you make of it. Follow your heart and fill the world with beautiful gestures. There is no action that is too small or too grand.

june11

in portuguese

June 11th International Day of Solidarity with Marius Mason & All Long-Term Anarchist Prisoners

Over the years, June 11th Day Of Solidarity with Marius Mason and All Long-Term Anarchist Prisoners has supported and highlighted dozens of prisoners. More recently we have been trying to include more prisoners from outside the U.S. to avoid falling into the easy path of U.S-centrism and to more faithfully represent the rich, expansive anarchist and anti-authoritarian struggles across the globe. (You can find out more at june11.org).

It is with this in mind that we are asking for your help to translate and spread this short message.

We know there are many prisoners whose stories have not made it to us, or with whom it has been difficult to establish contact. While June 11th focuses on anarchist and long-term prisoners, these are not strict qualities. We are eager to support anti-authoritarian prisoners of many stripes and from many struggles. June 11th aims to keep on our lips the names of comrades who are locked away from many years, long after many have otherwise drifted into the background as there are always new struggles, new emergencies, and more friends being targeted by the state. We generally use about a ten year sentence as a bench mark, but are currently supporting some prisoners who are serving 6 or 7. We don’t make this distinction to diminish the experience of comrades being removed from their communities and tortured for fewer years, but as an acknowledgement that more has to be done to sustain support and solidarity for those who will be locked up through many cycles of struggle.

We are asking you to get in touch with us if you know prisoners who would be a good fit and would like to be included with June 11th. When possible, we desire a dialogue with supporters so we can more deeply explore how we can support them and keep their voices in our activities.

Please help us to translate and disseminate this message as far as possible. We want to hear from you:  june11th@riseup.net

Yours in Struggle,
June 11th Committee

In Italian / Portuguese / German

[J11] Thessaloniki, Greece: Responsibility claim for placement of incendiary device

We perceive anarchist and antiauthoritarian spaces as structures in which we organize struggles and live collective moments outside the authoritarian relations that the State and capitalism would like to impose on us daily.

Lately, the State has carried out various attacks against squats and hangouts in Athens, Thessaloniki, Agrinio and Larissa.

In response to these attacks, during the night of 11th to 12th June 2017, we placed an incendiary device in a van belonging to AKTOR company on Makedonikis Amynis Street in Thessaloniki.

We know that this company constructs the enemy’s structures, such as the Skouries mine in the Halkidiki Peninsula, that destroys the earth for the benefit of capitalists, or the Thessaloniki metro, intended to support and strengthen the flow of capital.

We chose June 11th, international day of solidarity with anarchist prisoners facing long sentences, to express our solidarity with all captive comrades worldwide.

Fire to all prison cells.

Death to the State and Capital.

Direct action for anarchy.

source: athens imc

[J11] Komotini, Greece: Solidarity with long-term anarchist prisoners – “Sean Swain Was Here”

On Monday, June 12th 2017, we hung a banner at the Old Law School in Komotini as a small sign of solidarity with all long-term anarchist prisoners. We do not forget the comrade Sean Swain.

Utopia A.D. anarchist squat

in Greek

[J11] Exarchia, Athens: Banner drop in solidarity with Michael Kimble, anarchist prisoner in the U$

On Sunday June 11 2017, international day in support with long-term anarchist prisoners, we dropped a banner from Themistokleous 58 squat in solidarity with the comrade Michael Kimble, incarcerated in Holman prison, Alabama.

Michael Kimble is a gay black anarchist serving a life sentence for taking out a white homophobic racist. Even though he has been held captive for three decades, Michael keeps resisting the everyday imprisonment by all means necessary, and also propagates violent rupture with all Power.

With this banner we send him back some of the strength we get whenever we read his incendiary texts. Hold strong, comrade: your ideas and determination reverberate to the other side of the ocean.

NO PEACE WITH THE PRISON-SOCIETY!

Chaoten

in Greek

June 11th International Day of Solidarity with Marius Mason & All Long-Term Anarchist Prisoners

Each year, June 11th serves as a day for us to remember our longest imprisoned anarchist comrades through words, actions and ongoing material support.

*Communication is a weapon*

By now it is a platitude to speak of the isolation and silence that prisons strive to impose. Every week another one of our imprisoned friends tells us that their mail is getting fucked with, the phones on their unit are “broken,” or that our publications are being rejected with no recourse.

For us, one of the most exciting elements of June 11, 2016 was the proliferation of words and ideas shared between and from anarchist prisoners.  Along with spreading material solidarity internationally and keeping the names of our comrades on our lips, our contribution to facilitating that communication is one of our most important tasks. While the starting point of our project was support for Marius Mason and Eric McDavid (the first of whom remains imprisoned in an extremely restrictive unit, while the latter has been freed!), it has been through a spreading web of communications that we have expanded the scope of our project to solidarity with long-term anarchist prisoners around the world.  This year, we are seeking to emphasize this communication.

Maintaining communication is a lifeline for those caught in the snares of state repression or locked in its dungeons. Prisons function to isolate those held within these dungeons, to remove them from human community, and to break their will. Receiving letters and publications, being able to connect with individuals outside of the walls, and being able to call upon the solidarity of comrades on the outside are all vitally important to retaining dignity in dehumanizing conditions. When Chelsea Manning attempted suicide, communication enabled her and those close to her to mobilize and act. For prisoners who seem to live under a microscope due to their rebellious activities, a constant stream of letters shows their tormentors that they have friends on the outside and that there will be consequences for any action taken against them. Throughout the September 9th US prison strike, the relationships built over years made it possible to know of work strikes and rebellions happening in prisons all over the country, allowing supporters to organize counter-repressive action.

We must not, however, confuse actual communication with the absentminded chatter of liberal democracy. In totalitarian societies, speaking out can be subversive to systems of power; in liberal democracies it strengthens them. History textbooks teach us to speak truth to power, allowing power to better understand our frustrations so it can then maneuver to undermine us – either by regurgitating and disfiguring our criticisms as popular appeals or otherwise attempting to sell them back to us through edgy marketing campaigns. The more we tell power what we’re mad about, the better the chance they can manipulate us. Ranting on the internet is a microcosm of the pressure valve function of free speech in neutralizing social unrest. We are encouraged to say whatever we want, as long as we don’t actually do anything about it. Free speech becomes a fetish. For people who have never experienced a moment of freedom in their entire lives, freedom of speech is taken for freedom itself.

When direct action actually does take place, it either is castigated as coming from “outsiders,” or framed to fit into democratic rhetoric around speech. After the uprising against police in Ferguson, Missouri, Martin Luther King Jr.’s quote that “riots are the language of the unheard” went viral because it was a way to frame the uprising as revolving around freedom of speech, as if the silencing of Ferguson residents’ voices is what caused the riots, or that their rioting was intended only to amplify their voices.

When we speak of communication, we are not talking about “freedom of information” – media attention and generalized knowledge of the horrific practices and conditions inside prisons will never result in public outrage, nor will they cause a wave of shame that will wash over the authorities and affect them to the point where they’ll change what they’re doing. While trying to bring attention to issues sometimes has it place, we don’t expect anything from the authorities (or the “public”) and we know all too well that, especially in democracies, public opinion usually does very little to affect the policies or practices of the state. We’re talking about something different: that finding and speaking with our comrades is vital to attacking power and living full lives.

Within liberal democracies, prison functions to isolate those who do not take the bait of the democratic illusion.  We amplify the stories of those anarchists serving time in prison who have chosen active revolt against any regime of power rather than played into democracy’s games.  In February 2017, Eric King received sanctions – including loss of phone, visits, and commissary; increase in security level; and loss of “good time” – for writing poems and drawing cartoons depicting violence towards the Bureau of Prisons and the government in general. In early 2017, Sean Swain went on a successful 50-day hunger strike demanding the restoration of his email and phone communications, which had been cut off years ago due to his alleged threats of outside direct action against prison officials. In 2014, Bill Dunne received a 15-year “hit” to his parole, with the parole commission citing his “continued association and affiliation with anarchist organizations” as evidence he “still harbor[ed] anti-authoritarian views that are not compatible with the welfare of society.” Marius Mason is currently being held in the intensely-restrictive federal prison in Carswell, Texas, which surveils and controls his communication with the outside world and imposes harsh limits to his ability to connect with struggles on the outside. The comrades arrested in Italy under Operation Scripta Manent have seen their mail restricted, including a permanent seizure of all material from Croce Nera Anarchica [Anarchist Black Cross].

Despite the state’s best attempts to fetter our comrades’ tongues, imprisoned anarchists continue to contribute to struggles inside and outside of prison. Sean Swain’s Final Straw segments, Marius’ art and poetry, Jeremy Hammond’s incendiary tweets, and prison writings crossing borders and oceans show the innumerable and diverse forms communication can take in the belly of the beast.

That said, we want to share specific news of Marius’ struggles on the inside.  This year was filled with new heartbreak as the Bureau of Prisons developed means of isolating him further.  Beginning last summer, Marius began to see huge gaps in the mail he received, sometime going weeks without personal mail, with movement newsletters even more scarce. It was finally revealed via a phone call with a friend that FMC Carswell had been cutting off all communication about the National Prison Strike and thus any personal mail mentioning the strike was destroyed.

Even with these more obvious events Marius is going into his 10th year of incarceration, friendships and supports on the outside have been pushed to their limit, consistently thwarted in their attempts to get mail past Carswell’s complex and unexplained regulations.  Aside from the few close friends and immediate family he has left, Marius receives very little mail. Mail is his lifeline to the outside world. He needs supporters to recommit to correspondence, and to visits, for those of us who knew him before his arrest (a requirement of the BOP).  Know that letters which mention political actions will not make it through the tight censorship.

On the outside, new projects which seek to break down the barriers imposed by prison have flourished. Comrades all over the US and elsewhere have started publishing prison newsletters, giving wings to the ideas of our imprisoned comrades, enabling them to spread seeds in the “free world” and in the prison cells. Individual support websites, counter-information websites, zines collecting prisoners’ writings, the Certain Days calendar, the new Black Bridge website, and other efforts keep our comrades behind bars connected with us, and us connected with them – through creative expression, mutual contribution to theory, and strategizing for continuation of struggle.

This extends also to the realm of action, with solidarity rooting itself in the spirit of combative, internationalist struggle against prison and its world. Following the arrest of Pola Roupa and Konstantina Athanasopoulou and the detainment of Pola’s six-year-old child Lambros-Viktoras, diverse and combative actions took place, resulting in Lambros-Viktoras’ grand-mother gaining custody of her grandchild. The actions taken all over the world in solidarity with the US prison strike in September 2016 offer a clear vision of how words and deeds can mix in the cauldron of revolt. We also want to mention the upcoming Fight Toxic Prisons convergence in Texas, drawing the important connections between ecological devastation and prison society and rooting both in active solidarity with imprisoned comrades.

This year we challenge ourselves to weaponize our words and gestures to one another, to give them teeth. Let’s find ways to fight the censorship of those sending messages from the inside, and those sending strength and support from the outside. Let us not be satisfied with merely expressing our desires and ideas to whoever is listening, but really live them, and develop them together. The state wishes to crush our comrades by separating them from communities of struggle. We will not let it succeed!

[PDF for reading]          [PDF for printing]

More information: june11.noblogs.org

Athens: Incendiary gesture in complicity with rebels in France

During and after the “social movement”, we’ll never stop following our destructive passions, pursuing our dreams of freedom, sowing the chaos of revolt in the order of authority.
Tout peut basculer”; anarchist newspaper published in Paris

In the early hours of June 9th 2016, we paid a brief visit to the offices of the French insurance company AXA in the centre of Athens and torched one of their vans. We ruled out the possibility of attacking the building with the means that are currently at our disposal, for the simple reason that we wouldn’t have caused considerable damage beyond broken windows and perhaps a small fire. Nevertheless, their vehicle that was parked every night next to their offices gave us a good opportunity to attack them quickly and discreetly.

We attacked a target that’s located in an area where, in addition to patrols, cops are constantly present; we were also aware that the surrounding cafeterias and sex shops are frequented by cops with or without uniform. But it only takes a good preparation to strike every potential target.

We chose to attack AXA as a minimum display of complicity with rebels in France, who are fighting in the streets for more than three months. We make it clear, however, that this is not an act of solidarity with “social movements” or the leftists who ask for law reforms, more democracy and a “fairer” Power; nor with the unions that try to manipulate the revolt to satisfy their own interest; nor with “the poor people” or “the working class” who complain now that the legislation affects their pockets and want the State to guarantee them a return to normalcy and a welfare regime. A normalcy and welfare built on the obedience and servitude of the consumerist mass.

On the contrary, we seek complicity with the rebellious minorities who have exceeded the limits of peaceful protest, legality and morality dictated by domination, and find themselves in permanent confrontation with Power, spreading the virus of insurrection through deeds of rebellion in spite of the good citizens-lovers of the order, the “indignant” ones who act as firefighters, and the dogs that guard the unions.

Lastly, we dedicate this action to long-term prisoners on the occasion of the June 11th callout.

Strength to the CCF imprisoned members, Angeliki and the rest of the dignified accused in the escape attempt case.

Strength to Mónica Caballero and Francisco Solar, Michael Kimble, the accused in the Velventos case, Nikos Maziotis of Revolutionary Struggle, and all anarchist and dignified prisoners wherever they are.

Strength to the fugitives, Pola Roupa of Revolutionary Struggle, Gabriel Pombo da Silva, and all those who’ve gone into “clandestinity”.

Strength to the anarchist urban guerrillas wherever they are.

LET’S TURN THE WORLD INTO A BATTLEFIELD

Anarchonihilist Commando Gianfranco Bertoli
Informal Anarchist Federation
International Revolutionary Front

Greek | Spanish

USA: June 11th reportback from Bloomington, Indiana

Received June 20th 2016:

Here is a short run-down of events and actions that occurred in Bloomington related to the June 11th international day of solidarity with Marius Mason and all long-term anarchist prisoners:

– A benefit in late May raised over $350 for anarchist prisoners.

– A benefit dance party in late May raised over $600 for queer and trans prisoners, including anarchist comrade Michael Kimble.

– A ‘packathon’ event put together packages of books for prisoners.

– A letter writing night signed and mailed cards and letters to over 20 anarchist prisoners in the USA, Chile, Germany, Spain, Switzerland, Turkey, and Russia. Individuals’ translation skills enabled these to be written in the languages understood by comrades outside of the US.

– An informational night presented on the cases and current situations of over two dozen anarchist prisoners around the world.

– A movie showing of G.A.R.I., about an action group who held a banker hostage, demanding freedom for anarchists held captive in Franco’s prisons.

– A microphone demonstration and picnic. We played recorded texts written by anarchist prisoners, which were amplified. For three hours, the center of town echoed with the words of our imprisoned comrades. Afterwards, hundreds of flyers about Marius Mason were scattered around downtown.

– On the night of June 11th, anonymous individuals smashed out the windows of the probation office.

– A walk in Yellowwood State Forest in honor of Marius Mason. Years ago, Marius had spiked trees in that exact forest, in defense of wild spaces in Indiana.

– At most of these events, we set up a large table of informational handbills, zines of prisoners’ writings, posters, and prisoner addresses.

We are approaching the struggle against prison and the state with a basic proposal: that of polymorphous struggle.

We refuse any hierarchy of tactics, seeing each initiative as a tool which contributes to a diverse struggle. Fundraising, sending literature to prisoners, writing letters, spreading information about the struggles of our comrades, public demonstrations, attacking the state – all help create a space from which individuals can fight in whatever way is desirable to them or makes sense in their circumstances. We absolutely reject both the handwringing weakness that says that to act combatively for our comrades is dangerous, and the posturing militancy that finds no value in anything but “hard” actions. For us, everything that contributes to strengthening our comrades in prison and our shared struggle against the state is essential.

Anyone can contribute to this tapestry of struggle. All it takes is to be decided.

We send greetings to all imprisoned and fugitive comrades around the world.

Death to the state!
Long live anarchy!

in German, Greek

US prisons: June 11th statement by Jennifer Gann, aka Babygirl

Thank you for the opportunity to issue a statement on the June 11, 2016 Day of Solidarity with Long-term Anarchist Prisoners. First and foremost: as a California prison rebel and trans woman who has been incarcerated for 26 years, I truly appreciate the solidarity and support I’ve received from sisters and comrades in the struggle internationally.

I was first exposed to anarchist ideas as a young punk rock kid in the 1980s. However, I was not always an anarchist. I had a Christian upbringing in predominantly white, racist neighborhoods in Southern California suburbs outside of the L.A. area. I associated with skinheads and white prison gangs.

I didn’t come to prison for revolutionary acts. I was involved in an armed robbery with a couple of homeboys in 1990. We were just young street thugs. I was sentenced to 7 years in state prison.

I became politicized after participating in the 1991 Folsom Prison hunger strike, and in 1992 began a long-term struggle against prison authorities and torture. This resulted in multiple prison terms of 16 years and 25 years to life for assaulting a guard, an associate warden, and Sacramento County prosecutor. I spent 11 years in Pelican Bay SHU solitary confinement (1994-2004).

Several years ago, when I was released from Pelican Bay SHU, I completely renounced my racist past associations and was targeted by the Aryan Brotherhood. As my political development continued in the Prisoner Resistance, in 2007 I “came out” as a trans woman. I fully transitioned my gender identity, started hormone therapy, and joined a Maoist faction engaged in prisoner solidarity work. As a long-time anarchist sympathizer, I simply could not swallow Maoist aspirations for state power, and a “Joint Dictatorship of the Proletariat” that they envision would simply lead to more oppression.

In 2010, I joined Black & Pink as a “leadership” member for 5 years. This led to me becoming an insurrectional anarchist and trans feminist Amazon.

In 2011, I joined the California Prison Hunger Strike to end solitary confinement by doing a 23 hour solidarity strike. At the time, I was just finishing a 3 year long SHU term in Tehachapi for “battery on a peace officer.”

Since late 2011, I have been confined here behind enemy lines at Kern Valley State Prison, where I’ve continued to battle the administration, organize trans women prisoners, and literally fight off homophobic gang violence. My sisters and I have organized a trans-feminine Amazon faction called Loyal Queen Revolutionaries, and we continue to work with outside groups such as TGI Justice Project and the Transgender Law Center in San Francisco in an effort to change the hostile and unsafe prison conditions we face as trans women in male prisons. We will struggle and fight to abolish these oppressive institutions once and for all, by any means necessary! We will resist those who attack us, and avenge the mass rape and murder of our trans sisters.

Viva las Amazónas!
Viva Anarchy!

Solidarity with Mónica and Francisco!
Solidarity with FAI-IRF & the Conspiracy of Cells of Fire!

This is my action, and my statement for June 11th, against prisons and in solidarity with long-term anarchist prisoners. FTP!

Love and Rage!
Jennifer

babygirlgann.noblogs.org
betweenthebars.org

Volos, Greece: June 11th flyposting

In the context of June 11th, international day of solidarity with anarchist prisoners, the Assembly of Anarchists for the Solidarity Inside and Outside the Walls pasted large posters across the city of Volos (central Greece).

Click images to read the slogans (in English & Greek).

FROM KORIDALLOS PRISONS IN GREECE, TO THE FIES UNITS IN SPAIN; AND FROM FREIBURG PRISON IN GERMANY, TO FMC CARSWELL IN THE U.S.; FREEDOM FOR CAPTIVE ANARCHISTS; FIRE TO EVERY PRISON; JUNE 11TH, INTERNATIONAL DAY OF SOLIDARITY WITH ANARCHIST PRISONERS.

Strength to the imprisoned members of Conspiracy of Cells of Fire – No prosecution against relatives of political prisoners – Revolutionary action will walk over Asimina Yfanti [the judge who presides over the CCF escape case trial] and every judge – June 11th, International day of solidarity with anarchist prisoners

via Athens IMC

Bloomington, Indiana: Probation office attacked

On the night of June 11th, as a small gesture, we smashed out the windows of the probation office.

The police, courts, and prisons constitute a web of control that seeks to crush human beings, forcing conformity to a social order of hierarchy and exploitation. While this manifests itself as police murders and the brutalization of prisoners, more and more it takes the role of diffuse repression via systems of home detention, work release, parole, and probation. In each of these systems of self-policing, the ability of collective resistance shrinks to none, isolating those rebels who will not submit to these forms of soft imprisonment.

We can no longer accept the role of judicial power in our lives. We do not care if this takes the form of police cars on our streets, prison walls separating us from our friends, ankle monitors, or daily check ins. It all must go. We attack the system that floods into our lives as a reminder that its sprawl should not be normalized. As forms of repression grow beyond the prison walls it should be met with consistent attacks.

Each act of revolt opens up space for joy in our lives, space to breathe freely. Against the asphyxiation of prison society, we choose rebellion.

Total complicity with all those in revolt against prison and the state in all their forms.

Greece: June 11th action at Chile’s consulate in Thessaloniki

Today, June 13th 2016, we threw paints and flyers and spray-painted Chile’s consulate on Karolou Diehl Street in Thessaloniki on the occasion of the June 11th callout, day of international solidarity with long-term anarchist prisoners. As a small gesture, we also dedicate our action to the memory of comrade Mauricio Morales.

“Before Ι go to sleep I embrace chaos as an idea that liberates my body and mind because, after all’s said and done, it makes me feel alive. I don’t want to go in search of the grail that gives off freedom in future societies. My fingers seek the bloody flight towards the destruction of chains, towards the rhythmic fire, towards the near arson of Power and its masters. And my actions upon falling asleep are headed towards breaking with the routine upon waking up tomorrow, towards individual action with my chest like a stone, swollen by the destruction of this and every other society.
Do me a favor: make sure anarchy lives forever.”

[Punky Mauri, Antes de dormir abrazo el caos…]

Greek | Spanish

Greece: June 11th actions at the consulates of Italy and Switzerland in Thessaloniki

In the early hours of Saturday, we carried out interventions with paints and flyers at the entrances of the consulates of Italy and Switzerland on the occasion of June 11th, day of international solidarity with long-term anarchist prisoners.

Freedom for anarchist prisoners of war. Arson and fire to every cell.

via Athens IMC

Greece: June 11th action at the U.S. consulate in Thessaloniki

On Saturday June 11th, day of international solidarity with anarchist prisoners, we carried out an intervention at the American Consulate General in Thessaloniki.

During the action, we hung a banner reading: “Until the destruction of every prison, death to the world of submission – Freedom for anarchist prisoners across the world”. We also threw leaflets with the slogans: “June 11th, international day of solidarity with long-term anarchist prisoners” and “Until the demolition of the last prison, no one is free – Freedom for anarchist prisoners of war”.

Solidarity with anarchist prisoners everywhere in the world…

Strength to anarchists held captive by the U.S. State: Marius Mason, Jeremy Hammond, Justin Solondz, Michael Kimble, Rebecca Rubin, Sean Swain, Bill Dunne, Eric King…

via Athens IMC

Athens, Greece: June 11th graffiti and banners by the anarchist group Wild Nature

Against every form of incarceration – Freedom for Marco Camenisch & Marius Mason – June 11th Callout
Against prisons & everything that reproduces them – Strength to all incarcerated anarchists across the planet – June 11th Callout
Against prisons & everything that reproduces them – Strength to all incarcerated anarchists across the planet – June 11th Callout
Against every form of incarceration – Strength to all incarcerated anarchists across the planet – June 11th Callout

June 11th graffiti and banners by the anarchist group Wild Nature; against every type of incarceration; for the support of imprisoned anarchists throughout the planet.

[Spanish prisons] Immediate release of Gabriel Pombo da Silva, without further delay!

Let’s not allow the State to keep rebels in its clutches!

There seems to be some light at the end of the tunnel for comrade Gabriel Pombo da Silva, who has spent more than 30 years in Spanish and German prison cells.

He was extradited from Germany to Spain to serve a sentence of 3 years and 7 months thanks to a European detention order issued by the court of Albacete, which he has just completed following the application of a judicial decree. The same court in Albacete therefore issued an order for his immediate release on May 17th, and comrades went to the prison to meet him on the outside over the days that followed. In vain, however, as he is still behind bars.

The management of the prison where he now finds himself (La Moraleja prison in Dueñas, province of Palencia) and various judicial bodies such as the court of Girona lost no time in submitting a number of dubious procedures to prevent Gabriel’s release. These procedures are aimed at prolonging his imprisonment indefinitely, despite the fact that he has several appeals in course.

The fact that the State makes the laws for its own benefit and is the first to trample them is nothing new, regardless of what those who defend democracy say. It is also no surprise that the State’s cops are prepared to use any means to crush those who refuse to bow down before them.

In Spain, as elsewhere, the tightening of laws and penal codes, the repressive waves against “subversives” and the frenzied brandishing of the “terrorist” threat are ways of straightening out the world and forcing it into accepting a system based on exploitation and domination at any cost. Imprisoning and keeping imprisoned those who, like Gabriel, continue to express their refusal of authority and oppression come wind or high water is a way of kidnapping them and a clear message to those who, one way or another, attack this social order.

Voices from inside the prisons denouncing conditions, the guards’ constant extortions and even enclosure in and of itself, are heard regularly. If repression and prison restructuring have contributed to stopping collective struggles inside momentarily, they haven’t succeeded in completely stamping out revolt, which at times has found echoes beyond the walls. It is this spreading and breaking of atomisation that scares power, against which the State and its lackeys are carrying out a dirty war using physical and psychological pressure in conjunction with the usual judicial and prison based manoeuvres.

The situation of anarchist comrade Gabriel Pombo da Silva shows clearly that he is still in the sights of the institutions, which want to bury him in their dungeons for what he is, what he thinks and continues to express.

Solidarity is one way of responding to this war being unleashed against rebels.

May each individual express it in the way he or she considers appropriate.

Freedom to all. Immediate release of Gabriel Pombo da Silva!

Anarchists without borders
May 25th 2016

Fax campaign for the immediate release of Gabriel Pombo da Silva

Following the above communiqué, where the situation of kidnapped anarchist Gabriel Pombo da Silva was updated, an international fax campaign was proposed as one way of making pressure for his release.

The idea is to concentrate this form of protest from Wednesday June 8th until Saturday June 11th, coinciding with June 11th, the day of solidarity with long-term prisoners. Continue reading [Spanish prisons] Immediate release of Gabriel Pombo da Silva, without further delay!

US prisons: June 11th statement by Jeremy Hammond

Revolutionary greetings on this June 11! Solidarity with all Earth warriors and anarchists behind bars!

We are up against a system of power and profit, a system which is destroying the planet and forcing the people into poverty and imprisonment. Many of us who have fought back found ourselves in the crosshairs of an extensive counter-intelligence apparatus who use trumped-up “terrorism” charges and entrapment by informants to put us in prison for years. There are many lessons from each case to consider before engaging in future work, but it is most important that we do not let the seemingly overwhelming forces of domination intimidate us into inaction and passivity. Even those of us doing time, you know we stay bucking the system, and it brings us strength and inspiration to hear about your work in the streets, to hear about ongoing campaigns – such as the fight to stop the Bureau of Prisons from building a new maximum security federal prison in Letcher County, Kentucky, in the middle of a mountaintop removal coal processing area. This is a winnable opportunity highlighting the connections between the prison industrial complex and the exploitation of the Earth by profiteering capitalists.

But to succeed, we must consider the full range of tactics available. Everything from organizing conferences and sending books to prisoners, from lawsuits to protest marches, to hacking websites and sabotaging infrastructure. Every act of defiance counts, even if we do not immediately see the results of our efforts, because even small ripples can make big waves. Local actions have global consequences. We are spreading seeds of revolution, growing wild and free. Until we can overgrow and overthrow this system once and for all!

For the rev!
Jeremy
(A)

US prisons: June 11th statement by Casey Brezik

Hmm. I’ve been asked to write something regarding this year’s J11 theme. I have a strong opinion about this year’s theme and am also not a very elegant writer, so I hope not to offend anyone unnecessarily. Please forgive me if I do.

First, I guess, I should state that I’m adamantly against prison reforms for multiple reasons. I don’t want to find myself more comfortable within my confines lest I lose sight of the bigger picture and start feeling as through this place isn’t so bad. I don’t want to fall victim to that illusion for fear of not taking it so seriously. I’ve spent most of my adult life in prison, most of my “free” time has been spent on the streets in a state of abject poverty. Already I’ve done something stupid with the mentality that I was “tough enough” to handle even a life sentence and that’s a fucked up mentality to have. Fucked up and pervasive amongst convicts. After your first trip to prison you’re broken in and almost guaranteed to return having been disillusioned to what it’s really like. Recidivism rates are high for this very reason. We get out and find making an honest living as an ex-felon is extremely difficult, so people rationalize they can get money now and they’re able and if they return to prison so be it. Precisely because prison isn’t that bad!

So, for someone to suggest to make it easier in any regard I think is misled. Instead I’d suggest the best way to undermine the Prison Industrial Complex would be in making the transition for felons back into society easier. In doing so it would give cause for the recidivism rate to lower and ultimately reduce prison overcrowding, perhaps even leaving them empty and obsolete. Except then they’d just make new laws, right? Well, there’s no telling until we get to the point.

So, to sum that up why I’m against reform because of the psychological effects being more comfortable has on its subjects.

Also, I’m against prison reform because of the psychological effect it has on those advocating for it. Something is not always better than nothing. By pushing for reforms you’re lending your vote of support to the prisons. It’s saying, “Yes, they’re necessary, but maybe we can change them a little.” Even if you don’t mean it that way, ultimately that’s what it is. I’m against prison reform because prisons are a despicable thing that should be destroyed, not designed to be more comfortable. Prisons are fucked up. Their very nature is a twist on reality. By adding the state’s discourse to the concept, a further twist on reality, we end up with a huge mindfuck, both for people inside and out. There’s no beating it nor improving it until we’re able to fully accept that they are despicable and should not be there.

Lastly, I was to point out that inmates in segregation…hell, 99% of inmates period, are not anti-authoritarian. They are simply anti-“someone-telling-me-what-to-do.” Not so much against telling or coercing others into doing things. Everyone wants to be top dog. The people you’re supporting with this campaign against solitary and maximum security units are usually regarded as such. Of course, there are exceptions with long-term political prisoners, but there are always exceptions. The general rule of thumb is that if you’re in one of those units it’s because you pose a threat to other inmates, not so much the system in general. That is to say booty bandits for instance, or others that are excessively violent, rarely towards staff.

So for all of these reasons I’m against “the restructuring of the prison system and thus doubling down on opposition to Maximum Security, Isolation, and Communications Management Units.” Well, actually CMUs don’t fall in line with any of my issues. I am definitely against these. I’m also against every aspect of prison, though. But enough of what I’m against. How about what I’m for.

I’m for prisoner support systems. Support is comfort, but comfort from people that care about us rather than people who would rather beat us and look for reasons and excuses to take away what comforts we have. It’s comparable to at least psychological child abuse within these walls. They wish us no good. Some may be indifferent, but there are no well-wishers despite their words. From the outside is where our true comfort comes from. Don’t make us rely on them, nor to think they aren’t so bad. Reforms might be the easiest route, but the easiest route is seldomly the best. The best is destruction. Short of that, find middle ground and at least do no harm. Help support prisoners either on the inside or in their transition back to “society.” Don’t let us suffer this cruelty thinking we’re alone. Please show your support.

Solid.,
Casey Brezik

Casey Brezik
#1154765
NorthEast Correctional Center
13698 Airport Rd
Bowling Green, Missouri 63334 (USA)

German prisons: June 11th statement by Thomas Meyer-Falk

Fighting back: every day!

When I look back on the day of my arrest 20 years ago, I wasn’t imagining what I would have to experience during the next decades of my life.

The first decade they kept me in solitary confinement; since 2007 I’m in population. But I don’t know if or when I’ll get free, because there’s an old law from 1933. Passed by the Nazis on 24 November 1933 – the P.D. law (preventative detention), which allows the state to keep someone in prison for life, without giving him a life sentence. In their theory the P.D. isn’t a sentence – but the P.D. units are still inside regular prisons, inmates living in cells, bars are still at their windows, they’re going into the prison yard and being supervised by prison staff.

What is P.D. for? What are prisons for? Prisons are necrophilic places. There are living people who often have necrophilic attitudes, and there are working people who have necrophilic attitude as well. P.D. and prisons are made for a necrophilic society, for people who often have necrophilic attitudes, and these places are still made by people who have necrophilic attitudes.

A biophilic attitude is the one we’re still fighting for and which is fulfilling our hearts.

Biophilia is the passionate love of and for life and all which is alive. It is the deepest desire to encourage the growth of humans, plants, an idea, or a social group. A biophilic person prefers to build something new instead of keeping the same old things. A biophilic person will be, instead of have, more.

The necrophilic character is attracted by everything which is dead (things, money…all these are ‘dead’), ill, moldering, and they try to transform everything which is alive into something which is dead. So they love laws, orders, discipline, more than liveliness, because they fear it.

So, every day, millions of inmates in the world’s dark, cold dungeons are getting tortured, separated from their loved ones and from the life outside the thick and high walls, based on modern or on old so-called “laws” of necrophile-capitalist societies.

It is necessary and indispensable to fight against this brutal system. It’s not a question that a lot of inmates have done really terrible acts – but they’re also ‘products’ of a necrophilic society. No one can learn to love life and freedom in necrophilic places, which prisons are!

Prisons have to be abolished! It will be a long road we have to walk together before we’ll live in a society without prisons. But we have to fight for it. Day by day, month by month, year by year.

Let me add something about my own current situation, because comrades asked me what they can do to help me. It is important that no inmate gets forgotten! Support them, write them postcards and letters, collect money. But the work shouldn’t end in supporting individuals. Because of the millions of inmates, no one can help all of them – the strategic struggle against prisons and the prison-society needs more than individual support.

Thank all of you for your attention, for your good will and your support!

No state! No prison! No borders!

Thomas Meyer-Falk
long-term inmate (since 1996)
freedomforthomas.wordpress.com

in Greek

[USA] Wildfire: An Anarchist Prison Newsletter #4 (April 2016)

The new issue of “Wildfire” is out now. Download PDF here.

CONTENTS
– “Critical Resistance of the Yeast Variety” by Lacino Hamilton
– A letter from Brandon Gray
– “Reintroduction & Some Thoughts on Terrorism, Language, Context, and Strategy” by Brandon Baxter
– A message from Todd Shepard
– Another installment of “Buckin in the BOP” by anonymous
– Some thoughts from Anastazia Schmid
– “Solitary as a Weapon” by Jose Villarreal
– A letter from Stephen O. Swartz
– Response to Issue #3 by Sayf
– “In Defense of Fire & Smoke: Another Response in the Ongoing Debate on What Constitutes Reformist Tactic” by Sean Swain
– A chronology of some actions December 2015-March 2016

US prisons: June 11th statement by Michael Kimble

June 11, 2016

(A statement for the June 11th International Day of Solidarity with Long-Term Anarchist Prisoners)

First, I’d like to give warm revolutionary greetings to all those who have shown solidarity and supported me. Without that solidarity and support, I don’t know how I would have survived for so long.

As one who has spent 30 years in U.S. prisons, I’ve become intimately acquainted with control units, whether we call them Security Management Units, Special Housing Units, or Administrative Segregation – all euphemisms of penological sophistication in an attempt to disguise the true purpose and intent of such sinister tools of control and torture. Let’s be clear: they are torture chambers.

Former director of the Bureau of Prisons and now shareholder in the private prison firm GEO, Norman A. Carlson, stated that Marion’s control unit’s purpose is to “control revolutionary attitudes in prison and society” as well. Marion Federal Penitentiary is considered to be the first control unit in the U.S.

Now, across the globe, from Alabama to Colorado to Greece and beyond, control units are being established for those who refuse to conform to the regimen in prison and the normalcy of every life outside of prison, and most definitely for those who carry out revolutionary activities. Like the C-type prisons in Greece, designed explicitly for anarchist guerrillas. The design and intent is to minimize human contact through isolation and to exact an immense cost in human suffering.

In most control units, prisoners live in almost total isolation, far away from family and friends. It means restrictions on communications; censorship of incoming and outgoing mail and visits; constant harassment; and sadistic brutality from prison guards.

A few years ago it was reported that almost 36,000 human beings were housed in solitary confinement prisons in the U.S.

A study by the National Immigrant Justice Center and Physicians for Human Rights stated in their report that conditions of immigrant detainees placed in isolation not only endangered their health and safety, but also pressured them “to abandon their options for legal relief, their families, their communities, and often the only country they have ever known.” The study cites multiple examples of immigrant detainees who were placed in isolation solely because they belonged to “vulnerable populations,” such as being gay, bisexual, transgender, or mentally ill. Here in Alabama’s Holman prison segregation unit, three prisoners have committed suicide in the last eight months, and there have been numerous other attempts to commit suicide that were unsuccessful.

Most control units consist of cells without windows, to cause sensory deprivation and reduce visual stimulation, and those with windows are not able to be opened, causing stifling heat in the cells during the summer months.

On February 19, 2016, Albert “Shaka” Woodfox was released from prison after 44 years in solitary confinement. Woodfox was a prisoner who joined and co-established a chapter of the Black Panther Party at the notorious Angola prison in Louisiana in the 1970s and was charged with the murder of a prison guard. Woodfox is now 69 years old.

Hugo “Yogi Bear” Pinell was confined in California’s inhumane solitary confinement units for 43 years. He was recently murdered by white supremacists in collusion with prison guards after being released to general population on August 12, 2015. He had been a leader and prison rebel and a prime organizer of the Prison Movement in the 1960s and 1970s.

Whatever name they are called, control units’ primary purpose is control, to break the will and sanity of those who rebel and refuse to conform to an oppressive social order in or out of prison.

What we have to do is get angry and bring ourselves into direct confrontation with this most sinister aspect of the Prison Industrial Slave Komplex that is destroying human beings and suppressing revolutionary movements. We have to continue to do the million things we already do to attack the state, but we also have to be creative and create new ways of attacking the state and its institutions. Again, these institutions of the state are torture chambers designed to break and destroy the human will to rebel against that which oppresses them.

Shoutouts to all prison rebels and anarchists of action. Keep up the good fight!
Special shout to the Plateau Crew!

Fire to the prisons!

Michael Kimble
Dragon Cell
(Watch My Smoke)

in Turkish

June 11, 2016: Against Maximum Security Prisons – Against Every Prison

PDF versions versions of the call-out: for reading | imposed

June 11th 2016: International Day of Action

For June 11th, 2015, we emphasized transition in the struggle and in the lives of the prisoners we support. This year we’re focusing on a different kind of transition: the restructuring of the prison system and thus doubling down on opposition to Maximum Security, isolation, and `s. High-security facilities are not new: for example, Communications Management Units isolated Daniel McGowan and Andy Stepanian for years. But now we are at a new juncture: there is both a fresh focus on the part of the authorities reorganizing prisons to maximize repression against long-term and combative prisoners, while simultaneously cutting costs. In response there has been a wave of resistance and revolt–in the streets and in the prisons. As this wave spreads organically, we feel impelled to contribute in support of our imprisoned friends and comrades.

Around the world, repression intensifies against anarchists, their comrades, and their families. The left-wing SYRIZA government in Greece continues the isolation of rebellious prisoners in the C-type maximum security prisons. The Spanish state attempts to criminalize anarchist solidarity through an “anti-terrorist” spectacle of raids, arrests, and show trials. Anarchists from Santiago to Kansas City face decades in prison for choosing the path of revolt and for their refusal to bow before pressure from the state. Everywhere we look: the state’s jaws clamp down on rebellion.

But all this cannot break our comrades or the spirit of our struggle. As Mónica Caballero and Francisco Solar are sentenced to twelve years in prison, anarchists respond to their persecution with smoke and shattered glass. As the Greek state levels its force against the families of the imprisoned comrades of the Conspiracy of Cells of Fire and condemns Nikos Maziotis to life in prison, fugitive comrade Pola Roupa attempts to hijack a helicopter to free the imprisoned fighters. As Osman Evcan and Eric King both fight the state’s attempts to starve them for their refusal to consume flesh, comrades mobilize to ensure that their demands are backed with acts of solidarity. As the Chilean state continues to arrest and imprison anarchists, an intransigent minority strikes back in vengeance. As the State of Ohio continues to restrict Sean Swain’s communications, those holding the controls find their names and addresses spread online. As the state constructs an “anti-terrorism” roundup in Belgium, the multiform struggle against prison society there continues, unflinching and defiant. As the United States prison system continues its brutal enforcement of white supremacy and the social liquidation of undesirables, prisons from Alabama to Nebraska face the flames of rebellion. Everywhere we look, the revolt against prison society deepens and spreads.

Click here to continuing reading the text from June11.org

Bloomington, Indiana: June 11th 2015 round-up

This year, Bloomington held a week of activities leading up to June 11th:

June 2: A benefit raised $350 for Eric King, an anarchist held captive in Kansas awaiting trial for an alleged incendiary attack on a Congressman’s office.

June 6: An assembly was held to discuss prison projects and recent struggles of revolutionary prisoners and prison rebels.

June 8: A card and letter writing night for anarchist prisoners was held. A few letters were written and cards were signed for 20 anarchist prisoners in the United States.

June 9: The Pages to Prisoners Project held a 12-hour ‘packathon’ event where people responded to prisoners’ letters and put together packages of books.

June 10: A film showing of Lucio, a documentary about anarchist counterfeiter Lucio Urtubia.

June 11: A microphone demonstration was held at the town square with a dozen comrades handing out literature and holding banners. A sound system played Sean Swain’s 2015 June 11th statement, an interview with Michael Kimble, and interviews about June 11th and Sean’s recent struggles. Banners included “Free Marius Mason and All Prisoners” and “Free the Anarchist Fighters” with the names of long-term anarchist prisoners in the United States (Amazon, Bill Dunne, Rebecca Rubin, Jeremy Hammond, Jennifer Gann, Andrew Mickel, Blackjack, Michael Kimble, Sean Swain, Casey Brezik, and Marius Mason) and one awaiting trial (Eric King).

In addition, a message was painted at a swimming spot, reading “For Marius J. Mason and all imprisoned comrades: Wish you were here.”

These are all small gestures for our imprisoned comrades, gestures we hope can help break down the isolation imposed by prison. Raising funds, sending letters and books, and raising awareness about prisoners are all important. However, we must recognize them as parts of a polymorphous and combative struggle against prison society as a whole. The recent hunger strike of Greek anarchist and rebel prisoners, the successful hunger strike of Nikos Romanos, the refusal of Spanish anarchists to break beneath the weight of Operation Pandora and Operation Piñata, the wide array of attacks in solidarity with prisoners and against repression: these all offer glimpses of possibilities, of freedom and rebellion.

We send international greetings to Nataly, Juan, and Guillermo, anarchist prisoners in Chile who recently ended their hunger strike after 53 days; those facing repression in Operation Piñata and Operation Fenix; Chilean anarchist Tamara Sol, recently moved to a high security prison; Silvia, Billy, and Costa, facing charges yet again for an alleged plan to sabotage an IBM nanotechnology research center, for which they have already served years in prison; and Marco Camenisch, held captive since 1991. We also express our deepest rage at state murder of comrade Spyros Dravilas in Greece.

We will not forget that Bloomington was once home to Marius Mason and we will not cease to struggle for his freedom and the freedom of all prisoners.

Solidarity with all prison rebels!
Solidarity with all anarchist prisoners!
Solidarity with the fugitives running wild and free!
Against the state and its prisons, struggle continues…

from Anarchist News via Rififi

Finland: J11 solidarity action in Pyhäjoki

Activists fighting against Fennovoima’s nuclear power plant project expressed their warm greetings to anarchist and eco-prisoners as part of the international action day June 11th.

You are not alone

You are not forgotten

The passion for freedom is stronger than any prison!

In Finnish | Check out hyökyaalto for updates from Pyhäjoki protest camp